Sunday, October 10, 2010

2007 Toscar Monastrell (Alicante, Spain)

Mataro (Mourvedre if we are in France or Monastrell if we are in Spain) is a variety I want to drink more of. As a single variety they’re relatively rare in Australia but I’ve really enjoyed those which I have tried, particularly from Hewitson and Teusner, both in the Barossa Valley. Earth, game, and spice are often matched with a core of lovely ripe fruit in these wines, and as such really tickle my fancy.

The 2007 Toscar Monastrell broadly fits this mould, though is obviously different given that it’s from an entirely different country. It’s appealingly rustic and a good quaffer in the best sense of the term.

The nose isn’t especially expressive but has some nice aromas of plum, oak and some dried herbs. On the palate there is a bit more going on with that core of plum fruit enmeshed with flavours of spice, game, and herbs. There’s also a lovely smokiness throughout.

A great food wine and appealingly different from what I normally drink.

Rated:


RRP: $15
ABV: 13.5%
Website: www.salvadorpoveda.com


Red

2 comments:

Chris Plummer said...

Completely agree with everything in your first line here Red. In particular I'm liking what some Barossans are doing with the style in single varietal from as you also say here. I actually believe the region is better suited to single varietal mataro than it is grenache.

Would you believe I once had a disagreement with a cellar door hand at a well known McLaren Vale winery who was telling customers the Spanish word for mourvedre is mataro? :)

Cheers,
Chris P

Red said...

You could well be right when it comes to Mataro vs Grenache in the Barossa, though i'm open minded on the issue and think the trend with both grapes as single varieties is very promising.

On your cellar door experience, I've had quite a few experiences where i've overheard a cellar door hand telling a punter something that was factually incorrect. I find it a conundrum as to whether to correct them or not. You don't want to come across as a busy body wine snob, and yet you don't want the consumer to walk away with incorrect information.

 
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